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Spotlights

Polar Day, a free public event celebrating the natural and cultural value of the Polar Regions, will be held from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Friday, March 27, in the McCoy Natatorium and from 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the HUB-Robeson Center's Freeman Auditorium, both on the University Park campus of Penn State. Polar Day is sponsored by Penn State’s Polar Center. Joel Sartore, speaker, author, teacher and a 20-year contributor to National Geographic magazine, will give the keynote presentation at Penn State’s third annual Polar Day. Sartore, whose assignments have taken him to every continent and to the world’s most beautiful and challenging environments, from the High Arctic to the Antarctic, will present “Witnessing Change: Making Sense of Global Warming" at 12:45 p.m. in the HUB-Robeson Center's Freeman Auditorium.

Penn State DuBois Earth Sciences student Nicky Leigey, of Clearfield, has been awarded the Frank Felbaum Scholarship from thePennsylvania Chapter of The Wildlife Society (PATWS) for this academic year. She was presented with a plaque and notification of her acceptance for the scholarship at the Pennsylvania Chapter of PATWS Conference last weekend.

Accounting for wildfire is essential in achieving an accurate and realistic calculation of the carbon payback period associated with converting forest biomass into energy, according to a new study. Researchers said their analysis of carbon-accounting methods is expected to inform the scientific debate about the sustainability of such conversion projects.

The state’s solar industry leaders came to Toledo for Ohio’s first ever seminar on large scale and community solar energy projects held at the Toledo Museum of Art’s Glass Pavilion on March 27.

There’s only so much you can get done from inside a classroom.

Penn State professor Khanjan Mehta knows this, and so do his students in the Humanitarian Engineering and Social Entrepreneurship (HESE) program. That’s why they’re taking their skills out of the classroom and all the way to the African country of Zambia.

Robust. If I had to describe the final meeting of the UPUA’s Ninth Assembly in one word, I’d call it robust, and that’s not just because it was President Anand Ganjam’s favorite buzzword over the course of his year in office.

UNIVERSITY PARK When the humanitarian engineering and social entrepreneurship program at Penn State created what it thought was the perfect technology to aid farmers in Africa, all it needed was the right partner to help promote it.