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GEOSCIENCES COLLOQUIUM SPEAKER SERIES: Indrani Das, Assistant Research Professor, Columbia University’s Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory

Date/Time: 
Tuesday, September 3, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
022 Deike

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Colloquium Speaker Series with Indrani Das, Assistant Research Professor, Columbia University’s Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory will speak on “Internal Structure, Ice Dynamics and Basal Melt of Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica”  The event begins at 4 PM in 022 Deike with a Coffee & Cookies Speaker Reception preceding the presentation at 3:45 PM in the EMS Museum.

All are welcome.

 

Dr. Indrani Das, Assistant Research Professor

Marine Geology and Geophysics

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

Columbia University

 

Education

Ph.D, Physics, Indian Space Research Organization (affiliation: Gujarat University, India)

 

Research Interests and Activities

Das is currently the Principal Investigator on several NASA and NSF grants focused on the mass balance of Antarctica and Greenland ice sheets; mountain glaciers deep ice processes; climate change; and sea level rise. Her current passion is to use radar observations as boundary conditions in large ice sheet models to quantify long-term accumulation history and flow dynamics. She also works with the Gravimeter instrument to measure the shape of seawater-filled cavities at the edge of major fast-moving major glaciers. Her arsenal of tools includes airborne laser altimetry, satellite remote sensing, surface energy and mass balance models, and ice surface hydrology. Das is known for her expertise in discerning textures in the ice that disclose, generally, how a glacier is moving.

Das’ work on the NSF-sponsored aerogeophysical mapping of the Ross Ice Shelf includes quantifying the mass balance and understanding the structure and stability of the ice shelf using airborne shallow and deep ice radar and laser altimetry. One objective of the project is to develop unique ways to derive basal reflectivity from the ice penetrating radar.