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"We have a clear role to play in educating our students about sustainability. We certainly have a responsibility because of our teaching, research and service mission."
Chancellor, Penn State Brandywine

Penn State Lives Here

Developing ecosystems that purify wastewater... Rachel Brennan, associate professor of environmental engineering, rolls up her sleeves to develop ecosystems that purify wastewater.
Developing ecosystems that purify wastewater... Rachel Brennan, associate professor of environmental engineering, rolls up her sleeves to develop ecosystems that purify wastewater. Image: Penn State

Twenty-four campuses. 17,000 faculty and staff. 100,000 students. Over one-half milion active alumni.

All proving that the true measure of success is what you do to improve the lives of others. Penn State lives here.

 

“Pollinator decline not only has alarmed the scientific community but has gained prominence in the popular press, raising the public's awareness about threats to our ecosystem.”—Christina Grozinger, associate professor of entomology in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.Rescuing honey bee hives...
Honey bee colonies are collapsing in record numbers. A multidisciplinary team, made up of Penn State faculty and students, is looking at a number of different systems, including honey bee genomics, bioinformatics, and insect physiology, all with one goal in mind: to help the honey bee grow and thrive in the face of this crisis.

 

 

 

Two Penn State students, both landscape architecture majors, work together to remove the overgrown weeds from a Philadelphia rain garden.   Image: Chelsey Scott

Rebuilding stormwater systems in Philadelphia...
Penn State Extension is leading students in rebuilding green infrastructure sites in Philadelphia: a rain garden and a stormwater bump-out. These features are intended to capture and absorb stormwater, decreasing polluted runoff while also beautifying the cityscape. 

 

 

 

Work by a research team at Penn State and Rice University could lead to the development of flexible solar cells. The engineers' technique centers on control of the nanostructure and morphology to create organic solar cells made of block polymers. Image: Curtis ChanAnd helping to build inexpensive, flexible solar fuel cells.
Work by a team of chemical engineers at Penn State and Rice University may lead to a new class of inexpensive organic solar cells. Organic solar cells offer an intriguing alternative that's flexible and potentially less expensive.

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