PSU Logo

sustainability.psu.edu

In the Media

Sustainable Brands
Talia Rudee
Another innovation that could completely revolutionize textiles – particularly in the use of protective gear - has emerged from Penn State, where Melik C. Demirel, professor of engineering science and mechanics, worked to develop chemically protective suits made from fabric coated in self-healing films derived from squid teeth.
Centre Daily Times
Min Xian
Half a dozen Penn State student representatives of Climate Reality Campus Corp gathered on Old Main lawn Thursday. It is part of their campaign to see all of University Park campus’s electricity come from renewable sources. Emma Tilton, a faculty coordinator of the Climate Reality Campus Corps, said the campaign presented its proposal for Penn State to switch to renewable electricity to President Eric Barron last Friday.
Phys.Org
Half of all coral species in the Caribbean went extinct between 1 and 2 million years ago, probably due to drastic environmental changes. Which ones survived? Scientists working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) think one group of survivors, corals in the genus Orbicella, will continue to adapt to future climate changes because of their high genetic diversity. "The implications of these findings go beyond basic science," said Monica Medina, research associate at STRI and the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and associate professor at Pennsylvania State University. "We can look forward to using similar approaches to predict demographic models to better manage the climate change threatened Orbicella reefs of today."
The Daily Collegian
Frank Esposito
Like crime scene chalk outlines, parts of the walkways at the Nittany Apartments complex were marked with white arrows and notes for the Office of Physical Plant to follow them, a sign of the testing and troubleshooting OPP continues to perform to catch the source of the lead found in the water last week, according to Curtis Chan, manager of internal communications at Penn State.
Centre Daily Times
Britney Milazzo
In the midst of an anti-Donald Trump rally at Penn State on Tuesday also came a demonstration that generally doesn’t get much attention in central Pennsylvania — one that protests the Dakota Access pipeline. On Tuesday, a group of people held a march on campus in conjunction with the larger national Day of Action against the DAPL.
Onward State
James Turchick
Named after the Northern Cheyenne reservation MorningStar people, the Penn State MorningStar Solar Home spent negative 33 cents on electricity last Thursday. The completely self-sufficient house was initially conceptualized for the 2007 Washington D.C. Solar Decathlon but continues on as a hallmark of environmental education at Penn State. The competition is an international event sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. Teams design and build an entirely green, 800 square foot home. Emily Fucinato, an intern at the home, gives 3-5 tours of the house in a typical week and explains the energy-saving features of the once upon a time pipedream that’s now a cornerstone of Penn State’s environmental efforts.
The Wall Street Journal
About two decades ago, the electric industry started getting a makeover. A number of states launched initiatives to break apart monopoly utilities and allow retail companies to sell electricity to consumers. The question is, has the experiment with choice paid off, and is it time for the rest of the country to embrace open, competitive retail electricity markets? Andrew N. Kleit, a professor of energy and environmental economics at Pennsylvania State University, argues that more states should deregulate their electricity markets. Making the contrary case is Kenneth Rose, an independent consultant and a senior fellow in economics at the Institute of Public Utilities at Michigan State University.
The Guardian
Damian Carrington
2016 will very likely be the hottest year on record and a new high for the third year in a row, according to the UN. It means 16 of the 17 hottest years on record will have been this century. “It is almost as if mother nature is making a statement,” said climate scientist Michael Mann, at Penn State University in the US. “Just as one of the planet’s two largest emitters of carbon has elected a climate change denier [Donald Trump] - who has threatened to pull out of the Paris accord - to the highest office, she reminds us that she has the final word.”
Centre Daily Times
Leon Valsechi
President-elect Donald Trump has suggested in the past that climate change is a hoax created by the Chinese and during his campaign he continued the climate denial rhetoric, but Michael Mann, distinguished professor of meteorology and director of the Earth System Science Center at Penn State, said Monday there is reason to be cautiously optimistic. In Mann’s newest book “The Madhouse Effect,” released earlier this year, he crafted the prescient final chapter with a Trump presidency in mind. Mann teamed with Tom Toles, editorial cartoonist for the Washington Post and winner of the Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning in 1990, with the goal of taking a satirical approach to the climate-change discussion.
The Huffington Post
Alexander Kaufman
Under Donald Trump’s presidency, oil and gas pipelines ― including the controversial Keystone XL and Dakota Access conduits ― will crisscross the United States. Environmental protections will be scrapped, not one by one, but in a complete regulatory overhaul. The country will re-evaluate, if not toss out, the historic climate accord reached in Paris last year. Fewer government watchdogs will police pollution. “To quote James Hansen,” said Michael. E. Mann, professor of atmospheric science at Pennsylvania State University, citing the famed climate scientist, “I fear this may be game over for the climate.”
Scientific American
Andrea Thompson
The election of Donald Trump as the nation’s next president spurred celebration in some quarters and dismay in others, including among those concerned about the steady warming of the planet. In response to Tuesday’s landmark election, Climate Central reached out to climate, energy and policy researchers to see how they think a Trump presidency will impact climate research and efforts to limit future warming and mitigate what has already happened. We also asked what they think climate scientists should be doing in the coming weeks, months and years, including what they may personally be doing. Michael Mann and David Titley respond.
Climate Central
Andrea Thompson
In response to Tuesday’s landmark election, Climate Central reached out to climate, energy and policy researchers to see how they think a Trump presidency will impact climate research and efforts to limit future warming and mitigate what has already happened. We also asked what they think climate scientists should be doing in the coming weeks, months and years, including what they may personally be doing. Michael Mann and David Titley respond.
The Independent
Ian Johnston
Professor Michael Mann, of Penn State University in the US, who led research that produced the famous “hockey stick” graph showing how humans were dramatically increasing the Earth’s temperature, told The Independent the new paper appeared "sound and the conclusions quite defensible". “And it does indeed provide support for the notion that a Donald Trump presidency could be game over for the climate,” he wrote in an email. “By ‘game over for the climate’, I mean game over for stabilizing warming below dangerous (ie greater than 2C) levels.
Science World Report
Elaine Hannah
"Before the Flood" is a documentary film about the intense effects of climate change that are being felt by humans and other creatures all around the globe. It exhibits stunning images of the climate cataclysms. The film is starred by Leonardo DiCaprio, a U.N. Messenger of Peace and an environmentalist activist. He plays the role of a science journalist, who discusses and interviews researchers and innovators who are engaged in preventing the global catastrophes of climate change. These also include politicians, climate scientists, professors, farmers, islanders and even Tesla and SpaceX boss Elon Musk. Dr. Michael Mann, an atmospheric scientist at Penn State, said that the film provides more revelation about the new aspects of the problem of climate change. He also agreed with DiCaprio when he said, "The truth is, the more I've learned about climate change and everything that contributes to the problem, the more I realize I don't know."
The Snapper
Allison Remis
There’s many who discredit and disagree with climate scientists’ findings although the scientific community, as a whole, has accepted that climate change is real. Perhaps the biggest issue facing climate scientists, however, isn’t public denial of their findings, but corporate interests. We then meet Dr. Michael E. Mann, a Professor of Atmospheric Science at Penn State University, who received threats for his scientific findings on climate change. “Hatred and fear is, in fact, organized and funded by few players,” Mann states, citing Koch Industries and other fossil fuel industries for paying off Republican politicians in exchange for their refusal to pass legislation to transition into clean energy.
Wired
Marley Walker
The world has a lot of cows—more than 1.5 billion. And every day, US slaughterhouses turn nearly 20,000 of them into steaks, hamburgers, and roast beef. But before they become patty-worthy, each cow spends a lifetime chewing grub and burping greenhouse gases. Cows love grass. So scientists at Aarhus University in Denmark are engineering “super grass” they hope can cut methane without starving the cows of other vital nutrients. Through genetic selection, they’re looking for DNA in fodder that could be engineered to yield less gas build up in the rumen. Or, if not grass, how about meddling directly with the gut itself? Last year, a crew of Penn State researchers began adding 3-nitrooxypropanol, or 3NOP, into cow feed. Cows still get to burp, but the 3NOP binds enzymes to the bovine’s gut and prevents the gut microbes from producing methane. In experiments, cows with altered guts emitted 30 percent less gas than usual.
Onward State
Claire Fountas
Just a few years ago they were a couple of kids sitting around a table with nothing but an idea. Now, they’re 40 members strong and have been successful in beginning a large series of environmental sustainability solutions on campus. Members of Penn State’s Student Farm Club have changed the idea of what it means to be environmentally friendly on a college campus.
USA Today
Doyle Rice
Think you aren't personally responsible for climate change? Think again. The average American causes about 600 square feet of Arctic sea ice to vanish each year, according to a study released Thursday, and something as simple as your summer road trip may be to blame. "The article confirms some of my worst fears," said Penn State meteorologist Michael Mann, who was not involved in the study. He said the study shows that the model simulations typically relied upon to predict climate change impacts like sea ice loss "have indeed erred on the side of being overly conservative."
StateCollege.com
Claire Fountas
Just a few years ago they were a couple of students sitting around a table with nothing but an idea. Now, they're 40 members strong and have been successful in beginning a large series of environmental sustainability solutions on the University Park campus. Members of Penn State's Student Farm Club have changed the idea of what it means to be environmentally friendly on a college campus.
The Daily Collegian
Aubree Rader
Two names that will be on the ballot tomorrow are Republican vice presidential candidate Mike Pence and Democratic vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine. Pence offers a diverse background in politics with his past roles in various government offices. In regards to the environment, he denies climate change and is in support of oil drilling in the oceans.

Pages