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In the Media

Futurity
A'ndrea Elyse Messner
52 million years ago, giant coniferous evergreen trees called Agathis thrived in part of Argentina, where paleobotanists have found numerous fossilized remains. “These spectacular fossils reveal that Agathis is old and had a huge range that no one knew about—from Australia to South America across Antarctica,” says Peter Wilf, professor of geoscience at Penn State.
United States Environmental Protection Agency
Cathy Milbourn
Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced agricultural grants for Integrated Pest Management (IPM) practices to reduce the use of potentially harmful pesticides and lower risk to bees all while controlling pests and saving money. The Penn State project aims to protect bees and crops by reducing reliance on neonicotinoid pesticide seed treatments and exploring the benefits of growing crops without them.
CDT
Centre Daily Times
James Kasting
James Kasting, Evan Pugh professor of geosciences at Penn State, explains why in the past few years, interest has grown concerning the “habitable zone” around the sun and other stars.
Keystone Edge
Elise Vider
ConidioTec, a brand-new company spun off from Penn State research, has developed a non-toxic, environmentally friendly bio-pesticide that promises to safely and instantly eradicate bedbugs.
Grist
John Upton
The U.S. EPA still won’t follow Europe’s lead and suspend or ban the use of neonicotinoid pesticides believed to be killing honeybees and other pollinators — to the horror of beekeepers and environmentalists, who are suing the federal government over its inaction. Penn State University researchers will investigate the benefits of growing crops without treating seeds with neonic pesticides.
CDT
Centre Daily Times
Richard Alley and David Pollard
Record cold! Ships trapped in Antarctic ice! Even so, we can say with high confidence that the globe is warming because of carbon dioxide from our fossil fuel burning.
Centre Daily Times
Amy Ross
When the humanitarian engineering and social entrepreneurship program at Penn State created what it thought was the perfect technology to aid farmers in Africa, all it needed was the right partner to help promote it.
The Japan Times
Seth Borenstein
Hard-to-predict sudden changes to Earth’s environment are more worrisome than climate change’s bigger but more gradual impacts, a panel of scientists advising the U.S. government concluded last month.
Pocono Record
This winter the Penn State Extension Green Industry Team will offer a series of five sessions called the Green Industry Winter Updates.
CDT
Centre Daily Times
Jack Small
By June, green bins will accompany every group of trash and recycling containers in all Penn State academic and office buildings.
Futurity
Barbara Kennedy
A surprising discovery shows that two coral species previously thought to be one have developed different ways of surviving harsh environments brought on by rising water temperatures.
micromotors
GW Planet Forward
Researchers in Germany have invented micromotors that can propel themselves through water while degrading organic pollutants. The micromotors, which run on dilute hydrogen peroxide, could be used to clean up small reservoirs, pipes and other hard to reach places.
micromotors
Planet Forward
Researchers in Germany have invented micromotors that can propel themselves through water while degrading organic pollutants. The micromotors, which run on dilute hydrogen peroxide, could be used to clean up small reservoirs, pipes and other hard to reach places. Two experts in micromotors, Ayusman Sen at Penn State University in the US and Martin Pumera at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, both say that the big advantage of the micromotors is their self-propulsion, which speeds up reaction rates and, therefore, quickly degrades pollutants. ‘The [hydroxyl radicals] can reach the target pollutant molecules much faster than would be possible by simple diffusion,’ says Pumera.
synthetic polymer
Planet Forward
A new cost-effective polymer membrane can decrease the cost of alkaline batteries and fuel cells by allowing the replacement of expensive platinum catalysts without sacrificing important aspects of performance, according to Penn State researchers.
USA Today
Elizabeth Dennerlein
Before he went to college, Chris Golecki only knew how to change the oil and tires on his car. Now a graduate student, Golecki is helping lead the way to a more sustainable automotive world by competing in EcoCAR 2. “Through my education at Penn State, I built the baseline principles of what I needed to understand and then by joining the Advanced Vehicle Team (and working on the competition) it just was really a high-paced application of everything I learned,” Golecki says. Kristen De La Rosa, director of EcoCAR 2, says the competition is designed to give students hands-on experience, exposing them to the latest engineering tools, methods and mentors.

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