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In the Media

Tech Times
Ted Ranosa
A fungal disease known to kill millions of bats in North America can now be tracked using a newly identified fungus-infecting virus. In a study featured in the journal PLOS Pathogens, researchers from Pennsylvania State University discussed how they were able to identify a virus harbored by the Pseudogymnoascus destructans fungus.
Centre Daily Times
Sarah Rafacz
The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced federal funding Wednesday for 88 high-impact projects across the country, and some of that money is coming to central Pennsylvania. The funding is part of the Natural Resources Conservation Service’s Regional Conservation Partnership Program, according to the USDA’s website. In Pennsylvania, money will go toward improving soil health and reducing water pollution on farms in Clinton, Centre and Lycoming counties, according to a press release from Chesapeake Bay Foundation in Pennsylvania. CBF will collaborate with Penn State, the Pennsylvania No-Till Alliance, Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture, conservation districts in the three counties and other partners, according to the release.
Mashable
Andrew Freeman
Right now, a team of about 30 researchers are sailing through the turbulent waters of the Southern Ocean aboard an Australian research vessel named the "Aurora Australis," hoping to collect vital intelligence on East Antarctic glaciers. Their work on prior missions has already revealed some unsettling results. The information these scientists gathered during the Antarctic summer of 2014 and 2015 makes clear that glaciers and ice shelves in East Antarctica are vulnerable to some of the same forces that appear to have set into motion an irreversible melt of parts of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet in the Amundsen Sea. Richard Alley, an ice sheet expert at Penn State University who was not involved with the new study, said the research confirmed the predictions and hypotheses from the researchers. "[It's] worth pointing out that this is real science," he said in an email, "with predictions/hypotheses and confirmation."
Pittsburgh Business Times
Lydia Nuzum
Thomas Bartnik has been named director of the The Penn State Center Pittsburgh, succeeding retiring Deno DeCiantis effective Jan. 1. Bartnik most recently served as executive director at Pittsburgh Green Innovators. A certified urban planner and LEED accredited professional, Bartnik also served as director of planning and design at the Community Design Center of Pittsburgh.
Mashable
Maria Gallucci
U.S. climate scientists say they worry the incoming Trump administration might do more than cut off their research funding. Some also fear they could receive personal attacks and death threats simply for doing their jobs. Michael Mann, a climate researcher at Penn State University, said he knows exactly what that's like.
The Washington Post
Michael Mann
My Penn State colleagues looked with horror at the police tape across my office door. I had been opening mail at my desk that afternoon in August 2010 when a dusting of white powder fell from the folds of a letter. I dropped the letter, held my breath and slipped out the door as swiftly as I could, shutting it behind me. First I went to the bathroom to scrub my hands. Then I called the police.
Public Opinion
Jim Hook
A Penn State researcher has verified volunteer efforts by Pennsylvania farmers to clean up the Chesapeake Bay. "They have put a lot of their dollars and resources into conservation, so they should get credit for that," said Matthew Royer, director of the Penn State Agriculture and Environment Center, who oversaw the survey project.
Phys.Org
A new concept in energy harvesting could capture energy that is currently mostly wasted due to its characteristic low frequency and use it to power next-generation electronic devices. In a project funded by electronics giant Samsung, a team of Penn State materials scientists and electrical engineers has designed a mechanical energy transducer based on flexible organic ionic diodes that points toward a new direction in scalable energy harvesting of unused mechanical energy in the environment, including wind, ocean waves and human motion.
Centre Daily Times
Michael Mann
My Penn State colleagues looked with horror at the police tape across my office door. I had been opening mail at my desk that afternoon in August 2010 when a dusting of white powder fell from the folds of a letter. I dropped the letter, held my breath and slipped out the door as swiftly as I could, shutting it behind me. First I went to the bathroom to scrub my hands. Then I called the police.
Farm and Dairy
With guidance from Michael Naber, lecturer in geosciences, and code developed by two other Penn State Behrend students, Abel Lopez and Alexander Yochim, he created a web-based map with interactive data points for each tree, bench and memorial plaque in the park.
Phys.Org
Many Pennsylvania farmers in the Chesapeake Bay watershed have voluntarily implemented, at their own expense, practices aimed at improving water quality, according to newly released survey research conducted by Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.
Science Daily
A new concept in energy harvesting could capture energy that is currently mostly wasted due to its characteristic low frequency and use it to power next-generation electronic devices. In a project funded by electronics giant Samsung, a team of Penn State materials scientists and electrical engineers has designed a mechanical energy transducer based on flexible organic ionic diodes that points toward a new direction in scalable energy harvesting of unused mechanical energy in the environment, including wind, ocean waves and human motion.
Onward State
David Abruzzese
Penn State received $3 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy to create and utilize intelligent vehicle networks with the goal of reducing fuel consumption in heavy vehicles in transit by 20 percent.
Centre Daily Times
Roger Van Scyoc
As human beings, we care about what others think — especially when it concerns ourselves. Research says there is a biological reason for this insofar as the reward centers in our brain light up when others agree with us. When it comes to climate change, that perception, or fear of it, can keep us in the dark, according to a study by a pair of Penn State researchers
Leon Valsechi
During winter break Penn State drops the temperature settings in most campus buildings — the initiative has been conserving energy and resources for decades. During an 11-day period starting Dec. 22 and ending Jan. 3, the building temperatures will be turned down to 50 degrees as a part of Penn State’s commitment to the Department of Energy better building challenge program.
Phys.Org
Jennifer Matthews
Pressure, temperature and fluid composition play an important role in the amount of metals and other chemicals found in wastewaters from hydraulically fractured gas reservoirs, according to Penn State researchers. "We hope that this work will develop new ways for studying the processes that occur during hydraulic fracturing in a more controlled lab setting," said Travis Tasker, a doctoral candidate in environmental engineering at Penn State and principle investigator on the study. "This could also have implications for managing the wastewater that returns to the surface or understanding downhole mineral transformations that could form precipitates, clog pores and reduce a well's gas productivity."
Medill Reports Chicago
Janice Cantieri
You can’t open a McDonald’s ketchup packet without the little notch. Try it, okay?” noted climatologist Richard Alley. Without the little notches, plastic ketchup packets are almost impossible to open no matter how much you pull or tear. Cracks in the world’s ice sheets are like those little notches, Alley said. Once these cracks appear in ice sheets, the stress concentrates there and eventually can lead to large sections of ice falling off and melting quickly.
Centre County Report
Mike Gilbert
The Campus and Community Sustainability Expo showcased some work from Penn State students last Wednesday. Reporter Mike Gilbert was there.
The Daily Collegian
Matt Guerry
After working on real-world problems posed by corporate sponsors this semester, engineering students at Penn State got to show off their hard work at a design showcase held in the Bryce Jordan Center on Thursday afternoon. Lauren Hauptschein and Bridget Ray (freshmen–industrial engineering) were part of a team that prototyped possible solutions to water recycling on hydraulic fracking plants for Chevron. “The big thing with this project is that they wanted us to define sustainability,” Haupstschein (freshman-industrial engineering) said. “They’re really pushing to make their company more sustainable for the environment.”
Centre Daily Times
Alex Curtze spent his semester with a few thousand edible critters. They came prepackaged in a crunchy exterior. This year, Curtze, a Penn State senior studying environmental resource management, became a cricket farmer. As part of an internship with the Penn State Student Farm, he studied how to maximize their growth because crickets, he believes, could provide a cheaper way to feed the world. “Meat production, for example, requires a lot of resources, especially in feeding the livestock,” he said. “Crickets could be a more sustainable food source.”

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